Results list

2016, a record year for AFD

11/05/2017

With a record year in 2016 marked by EUR 9.4bn of commitments, AFD is taking action in new fields, particularly in continental Africa

Rémy Rioux, Chief Executive Officer of AFD, presented today AFD’s results for 2016, from the perspective of its strategy for 2020.

At the request of the French President in 2015, AFD has significantly increased the volume of its financing, in line with the international community’s objectives (SDGs, Paris Climate Agreement), formed its strategic alliance with Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations, and extended its scope of operations. 
 

 

 

Rémy Rioux, its Chief Executive Officer, explains AFD’s strategy: “2016, the year of its 75th anniversary, was marked by the increase in AFD’s commitments, its strategic alliance with Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations, and the strengthening of its partnerships with civil society, territorial authorities, the private sector, bilateral and multilateral development banks, European institutions and the major foundations. With EUR 9.4bn of commitments, AFD has set out on an ambitious growth path to support the major transitions in developing countries and the French overseas territories. With its new strategy, AFD will be playing a leading role in supporting the emergence of a common world.”

In 2015, the French President set for AFD the objective of increasing its activity by +60% by 2020 to some EUR 13bn of annual commitments. It set out on this growth path in 2016.

EUR 9.4bn of projects were financed by AFD: i.e. +13% in 1 year.

Africa, all Africa, is AFD’s priority, with some EUR 4bn of commitments in 2016, a +25% increase.

  • Between 2010 and 2016, EUR 22bn were committed in Africa.
  • In January 2017, at the Bamako Summit, the French President made an even more ambitious commitment for AFD: EUR 23bn will be committed for Africa over the next five years.
  • AFD has supported renewable energy development by committing EUR 600m in Africa in 2016. It plans to devote EUR 3bn to the sector by 2020.

AFD is operating in new countries and new sectors: 

  • Argentina, Cuba, the Balkans: AFD will be extending its geographical area of operations towherever the support of a committed and solidarity-focused development bank is useful.
  •  AFD’s new strategy opens up areas of action for the future, in sectors in which AFD did not previously operate or had limited activity: governance, cultural industries, higher education, innovation and digital technology, social business, the external action of local authorities, education in development and international solidarity.

AFD and CDC: A strategic alliance active in the field

The strategic alliance between the two institutions, signed on 6 December 2016, is being operationalized in the field. At international level, it is leading to common tools, such as the EUR 600m infrastructure investment fund, whose creation was recently announced by the two Chief Executive Officers in Burkina Faso. In France, it is bringing about a closer partnership with regional and local authorities and all development actors in territories.

 


AFD’s action in 2016

Action on the five continents:

  • 50% of AFD’s financial commitments in foreign countries (some EUR 4bn in 2016, i.e. +25% in one year) are devoted to Africa, all Africa, a priority for AFD’s action, where 84% of the budget resources allocated by the State are focused. In its new strategy, AFD considers Africa as a whole: from Morocco to South Africa, from Senegal to Djibouti, with its regional dynamics, without separating the North of the Sahara from the South.
  • 20% in Asia and the Pacific to finance low-carbon projects (EUR 1.3bn in 2016).
  • 20% in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a focus on sustainable urban development (EUR 1.1bn in 2016).
  • 10% in the Middle East to finance inclusive and resilient growth (EUR 741m in 2016).
  • In 2016, AFD also earmarked EUR 1.6bn of financing for the French overseas authorities.

The markers of AFD’s action: 6 x 50%
AFD, France’s development bank, which is solidarity-focused and committed to working for populations in the South and the French overseas territories, bases its action on 6 strong markers:

  • 50% of its commitments abroad are in Africa
  • 50% of its activity concerns French-speaking countries and territories
  • 50% of its projects have positive impacts on the climate
  • 50% of its projects contribute to reducing gender inequalities
  • 50% of its beneficiaries are non-State actors (State-owned or private companies in Southern countries, local authorities, public institutions, NGOs, banks) 
  • 50% of its projects are cofinanced with other donors

AFD finances sustainable growth paths that contribute to the five major transitions which both developing and developed countries are undergoing: demographic and social transitions, territorial and ecological transition, energy transition, digital and technological transition, political and citizen-based transition.

Solutions which bring about positive impacts for populations

In 2016, AFD financed 657 development projects, which have, for example:

  • improved urban transport in New Caledonia;
  • managed tensions between host and refugee populations in Lebanon and Jordan;
  • built Burkina Faso’s energy autonomy;

Projects with measurable concrete impacts every year. Over the past 5 years, on average: 

  • 730,000 family farms supported;
  • 665 MW of renewable energies installed;
  • improved access to water and sanitation for 1.2 million people;
  • 54,000 SMEs supported;
  • 832,000 children sent to school.

 ► Find out more about the results for 2016

What if growth in Official Development Assistance was not just about figures?

09/05/2017

The UK has devoted 0.7% of its gross national income to Official Development Assistance since 2013. Germany achieved this target in 2016. The USA is the leading donor country in absolute terms, having doubled its resources in fifteen years. France’s efforts would appear to be out of step with those of the countries mentioned above. What does it need to build political and social unity over the issue of international development? What agreement can be sought between actors, and on what basis? This is the subject of the report entitled “Seeking Agreement on Official Development Assistance”.

The author of this report, Henry de Cazotte, interviewed over 170 people between December 2016 and April 2017. His aim was to seek to understand how, over the past 20 years, development actors in each country – leaders from all spheres, NGOs, parliamentarians, public, private and religious institutions, the media and researchers – have forged high quality interactions.

From Berlin to Bonn, from Frankfurt to Washington, or in London, Brussels and Luxembourg, the interviews brought out different national profiles, but what they have in common is a certain continuity in the development policy built over the past 20 years, despite changes in governing parties.

Aga Khan Health Services and French agencies partner to improve Palliative Care in Kenya and Tanzania

19/04/2017

The Aga Khan Health Services (AKHS), an agency of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) and Expertise France today signed an agreement to enhance the quality of palliative care services in the Aga Khan Hospitals in both Kenya and Tanzania. The programme is being grant funded by the Agence Francaise de Developpement under which AKHS will receive 250,000 € to conduct specialised training for 4 doctors and 4 nurses – also known as “champions” through the Institut Curie.


The Euros 250,000 grant will go towards the implementation of a pilot palliative care training project for professionals from four hospitals of the Aga Khan Health Services in Kenya (Nairobi, Kisumu and Mombasa) and Tanzania (Dar Es Salaam). The programme will be implemented by Institut Curie, world renowned for their technical expertise in palliative and supportive care and their pragmatic, tailor-made trainings. Expertise France has been instrumental in working with the Aga Khan Health Services and Institut Curie to develop the overall implementation plan.

According to Dr Alexis Burnod, the project’s key expert and responsible for implementing Institut Curie’s training activities, « The spread of palliative care culture as a criterion of healthcare excellence towards patients and their families is a universal invitation. It is the result of the work of an entire team dedicated to promote a comprehensive care focused on the patient. This partnership programme with our Kenyan and Tanzanian counterparts reinforces this international humanist dynamic”.

“Our 15 years of experience creating partnerships and exchanges between hospitals in the North and the South have shown the value of giving healthcare professionals the opportunity to learn from one another – improving not only skills, but also the organisation and the continuum of care” added Mr Sebastien Mosneron Dupin, CEO of expertise France.

The partnership will bring Kenya and Tanzania closer to their goal of establishing palliative care services in the region by providing specialised clinical training as well as by enabling hospital professionals to establish designated palliative care units. Experts from Institut Curie and Expertise France will provide continual support and feedback throughout the process, resulting in invaluable information for advocacy, policy changes and scaling-up of the programme.

Palliative care in low-income countries

The quality of life of patients and their families facing life-limiting illness is a growing concern in low-income countries, particularly in Africa. Low income countries are disproportionately burdened with chronic diseases such as cancer, HIV-AIDS, kidney, heart and respiratory disease and face particular challenges in providing palliative care.

According to WHO and the World Palliative Care Alliance, a staggering 78% of the 19.2 million adults requiring palliative care are estimated to be in middle- and low-income countries. Often, health facilities in these countries lack pain medication, adequate hospital facilities, specially-trained medical staff, designated palliative care units and government or policy support. In particular, opioid pain-relief is very limited, and often prohibited from importation in a large number of African and Central/South Asian countries: an estimated 80% of the world’s population currently lacks access to opioids for pain relief at the end of one’s life.

“This partnership comes at a time when there is a large unmet need for palliative care within the health systems in Kenya and Tanzania,” said Dr. Gijs Walraven, Director of Health, signing the agreement on behalf of the Aga Khan Development Network. “There is an urgent need for education, and for advocacy with decision makers to take action and create enabling environments for palliative care at the national level.”
 

Improving palliative care in Kenya and Tanzania

The enhancement of palliative care in middle and low-income countries is a key priority for the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), working mainly in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Expertise France has also responded to the burden of chronic and non-transmissible diseases in its strategy for improving health in middle- and low-income countries. The Institut Curie is a leading French institution for cancer care and research and has developed an innovative, multidisciplinary and comprehensive approach to palliative care.
 

 


About Aga Khan Health Services
The Aga Khan Health Services (AKHS) is one of three agencies of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) that support activities in health.  The others are the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF) and the Aga Khan University (AKU). Together, the three agencies provide quality health care to five million people annually and work closely on planning, training and resource development.  AKHS also works with the Aga Khan Education Services (AKES) and the Aga Khan Agency for Habitat (AKAH) on the integration of health issues into specific projects. The AKDN health system has been operating in East Africa for over 80 years. Its expanding East Africa Integrated Health System is dedicated to providing high-quality health coverage at affordable prices to an economically diverse population.


About Expertise France
Expertise France is the French public agency for international technical assistance. It aims at contributing to sustainable development based on solidarity and inclusiveness, mainly through enhancing the quality of public policies within the partner countries. Expertise France designs and implements cooperation projects addressing skills transfers between professionals. The agency also develops integrated offers, assembling public and private expertise in order to respond to the partner countries' needs. ► www.expertisefrance.fr


About the Institut Curie
A leading player in the fight against cancer, Institut Curie brings together an internationally-renowned research centre and an advanced hospital group that provides care for all types of cancer – including the rarest forms. Founded in 1909 by Nobel laureate Marie Curie, Institut Curie comprises three sites (Paris, Saint-Cloud and Orsay), where more than 3,300 members of staff are dedicated to achieving three objectives: hospital care; scientific research; and the sharing of knowledge and the preserving of legacy. As a private charitable foundation since 1921 that is recognised as serving the public interest, Institut Curie is supported by donations and grants. This support is used to fund discoveries that will improve treatment and the quality of life of cancer patients.
 

17/03/2017

IFAD and AFD strengthen partnership with €200 million loan to invest in rural development

13/03/2017

Rome - The heads of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and AFD today signed an agreement to work together to develop rural areas, which includes the provision of a €200 million loan to IFAD.

This loan gives the opportunity to increase investment in rural areas of developing countries and help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals of ending hunger and poverty by 2030.

"This is an important agreement between IFAD and AFD,” said Kanayo F. Nwanze, President of IFAD. “At a time when governments face constraints on development funding, and with the demand for IFAD’s services higher than ever, this loan gives us the opportunity to increase investment in rural areas of developing countries and help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals of ending hunger and poverty by 2030.”

“Through AFD, France wanted be the first member of state to support, under IFAD's sovereign borrowing framework, its 2016-2018 programme. This sovereign loan of 200 million euros marks, I am convinced, a new step in the partnership relations between our institutions. We both share a common dedication to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Joining our forces for agricultural, rural and local development is a key step in this direction”, said AFD’s Director General Rémy Rioux.

AFD, a public financial institution that implements policy defined by the French government, seeks to combat poverty and promote sustainable development. IFAD is an international financial institution and specialized United Nations agency focused on eradicating rural poverty. Both organizations share a similar approach to agricultural and rural development and prioritize investments in small-scale farming and share the goals of achieving food security and sustainable rural development. 

The two organizations have already collaborated on a number of initiatives including the development of weather insurance products and support to farmers’ organisations in Africa. Through the Memorandum of Understanding and the loan agreement signed today, the two organizations commit to working closely together in the future, with a focus on increasing investments in rural finance, adaptation to climate change, gender equality and stemming migration.

 


About IFAD
IFAD invests in rural people, empowering them to reduce poverty, increase food security, improve nutrition and strengthen resilience. Since 1978, we have provided US$18.4 billion in grants and low-interest loans to projects that have reached about 464 million people. IFAD is an international financial institution and a specialized United Nations agency based in Rome – the UN’s food and agriculture hub. www.ifad.org
 

One Africa: Challenges of a Continentwide Approach

09/03/2017

AFD is marking the preparation of its new strategy for Africa by organizing a symposium on 12 April at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris, in partnership with France Médias Monde . High-level speakers will be discussing these issues during various roundtables.


 

30 million km2. 1.2 billion inhabitants. 2,000 modern languages. 54 countries. 5 different climates. 1 continent.

Yet Africa is very often understood in a dual manner: North Africa on the one hand, and Sub-Saharan Africa on the other. This is, at any rate, the framework of interpretation adopted by donors, in their approach to relations with the continent. Such an interpretation presupposes that there is a homogeneity across Sub-Saharan Africa, which is neither proven, nor necessarily experienced or thought of in such a way by the continent’s populations and institutions.

What are the political, social, economic and cultural dynamics at work today, from Cape Town to Rabat, from Dar-es-Salaam to Nouakchott? What are the issues of a continentwide approach to Africa? What are the views today of philosophers, economists and entrepreneurs on this subject?

These are all questions which Agence Française de Développement wishes to debate during this symposium, at a time when it is developing its new strategy for Africa. High-level speakers will be discussing these subjects during various roundtables.

 

Download the program

Find information about the speakers


 
In partnership with France Médias Monde and Institut du Monde Arabe 
 

    

www.rfi.fr      www.mc-doualiya.com/      www.france24.com/fr/

 © Photo Yellow Mao

 
 
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